ChinaCache

Meanwhile in China: Weekly News Roundup [9/25-9/29]

  • Alibaba Says It’s About to Build Up a Massive Logistics Network

    Chinese e-commerce firm Alibaba Group announced it will invest 100 billion yuan ($15.12 billion) over five years to build a global logistics network and also take control of a $20 billion unit, underpinning an aggressive overseas expansion.

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Source: Fortune

 

 

  • China Blocks WhatsApp, Broadening Online Censorship

    WhatsApp now appears to have been broadly disrupted in China, even for text messages. The Chinese authorities have a history of mostly, blocking internet services, and slowing them down so much that they become useless. The censorship has prompted many in China to switch to communications methods that function smoothly and quickly but that is easily monitored by the Chinese authorities, like the WeChat.

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Source: NYTimes

 

 

  • Countdown Looms For BTCC’s Bitcoin Trading End

As BTCC enters its final week of Bitcoin trading operations, all eyes are on how the impact of the shutdown of all cryptocurrency exchanges in China is rocking the price of Bitcoins around the world. China’s leading Bitcoin platform BTCC announced two weeks ago that it would cease registering new users, and the company will stop all trading businesses from September 30, 2017. The news caused a dive of Bitcoin price by nearly 30%.

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Source: ChinaTechNews

 

 

  • Tencent launched a digital bank card on WeChat

    Tencent launched a digital bank card on WeChat called WeBank Card via WeBank, China’s first private commercial bank established. One of its major shareholders is Tencent. Users can now complete the card setup in the comfort of home, without having to make a trip down to the bank to fill an application form. Users will no longer worry about losing the cards and the troublesome process they have to go through to get a replacement card.

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Source: China Internet Watch

 

 

  • 68 Things You Cannot Say on China’s Internet

    The well-known China’s Great Firewall, the country’s system of internet filters and controls, are trickier to navigate, in part because they are subjective and even contradictory. And there are more and more of them. But the new restrictions reflect an ambitious effort by the government to impose discipline and rein in the web.

     

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Source: NYTimes